Jun 172011
 

This seems like it should be easy, but SSRS has nothing built in to allow you to do this.  I searched an couldn’t come up with a solution that fit all my requirements for a report. There are ways to default the selection list to every value in the list, but I needed to add the option of ALL to my parameter list, default to ALL, and then most importantly have ALL show up in my header instead of showing every item in the list.  I was determined to find a way, and here is how I did it.

In this example I would like to allow the report to default to ALL Layout Codes, rather than selecting every Layout Code in the list.  there is already a multi-select parameter in the report called Layout_Code, and the main query filters where Layout_Code IN (@Layout_Code)

1. ADD ‘ ALL’ TO YOUR PARAMETER QUERY

The first thing to do is add the value ‘ALL’ to your parameter query.  You’ll want it show up at the top of your select list.  A simple way to do this is to put a space before the A to make it sort to the top.

SELECT DISTINCT Layout_Code
FROM         Your_Table
UNION
SELECT     ‘ ALL’ AS Layout_Code
ORDER BY Layout_Code

2. EDIT YOUR MAIN QUERY TO USE BOTH PARAMETERS

Edit the where clause in your main query.  If you are using Query Designer in Text mode, simply add this statement.  Be sure to use outer brackets to contain both statements if you have other items in your where clause.

WHERE (‘ ALL’ IN (@Layout_Code))    OR     (Layout_Code IN (@Layout_Code)) )

If you have multiple parameters in your main query are using Query Designer in the View mode rather than Edit Text mode, your WHERE clause will have to return all combinations using AND and OR.  Let Query Designer build your query for you by using outer brackets and replace:

(Layout_Code IN (@Layout_Code))  

with

(   (‘ ALL’ IN (@Layout_Code))    OR     (Layout_Code IN (@Layout_Code))   )

I suggest you have your WHERE clause already complete before adding the OR, since the results can get confusing. 

3. CASCADING PARAMETERS WITH ‘ ALL’

You can use this method for cascading parameters where multiple parameters have the ALL value added.  You’ll need to add the OR clause to your underlying parameter queries where applicable.

For example, if you have a parameter preceding the Layout_Code parameter called Layout_Group you will follow the same steps above, plus an additional step to edit the Layout_Code dataset query.

  1. Add ‘ ALL’ to your Layout_Group parameter with a Union clause and add an order by
  2. Edit your main query where clause to use @TopLayoutCode . Adjust the AND/OR in the WHERE clause accordingly.
  3. Edit your cascaded parameter query, in this case Layout_Code, to OR in the where clause.  Adjust the AND/OR accordingly.

Your main query where clause will look like this in the Query Designer View mode:

WHERE  �
(‘ ALL’ IN (@Current_Layout_Group)) AND (‘ ALL’ IN (@Layout_Code)) OR
(‘ ALL’ IN (@Current_Layout_Group)) AND (Layout_Code IN (@Layout_Code)) OR
(‘ ALL’ IN (@Layout_Code)) AND (Layout_Group_Current IN (@Current_Layout_Group)) OR
(Layout_Code IN (@Layout_Code)) AND (Layout_Group_Current IN (@Current_Layout_Group))

Your Layout_Code query will look like this

SELECT DISTINCT Layout_Code
FROM         Your_Table
WHERE     (Layout_Group_Current IN (@Current_Layout_Group)) OR (‘ ALL’ IN (@Current_Layout_Group))UNION
SELECT     ‘ ALL’ AS Layout_Code
ORDER BY Layout_Code

4. SET YOUR PARAMETER DEFAULTS TO ALL

Set the default value for each of your parameters, Layout_Code and Layout_Group, to the value ALL.  Be sure to put a space before the A if you are using this method to sort your list in Step 1.

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Jun 082011
 

Sometimes you run into a situation where you want to allow users to update data in a simple fashion, and incorporate the data into a data warehouse.  For example the client’s ERP system maintains the data element called Departments but doesn’t have the ability to store Department Groups for reporting since it is not relevant to the ERP system.  Using a SharePoint list as a data source can be an easy solution.  Users can update it very simply, your ETL package can add or update new Departments from the ERP system via the data warehouse, and you can pull the user entered data back into the data warehouse.  There are some drawbacks to it, such as lack of data integrity checks on the SharePoint side.  But if you build your ETL package right, you can correct any integrity issues which might be created by user error. 

Here is what I will demonstrate, using a SharePoint list to manage the applying Department Groups to Departments which are maintained in the accounting system:

PART 1 – DOWNLOAD AND INSTALL SSIS TOOLBOX ITEMS

PART 2 – USE THE SHAREPOINT LIST AS A DATA SOURCE

PART 3 – INSERT RECORDS INTO THE SHAREPOINT LIST

PART 4 – UPDATE RECORDS INTO THE SHAREPOINT LIST

PART 5 – DELETE RECORDS INTO THE SHAREPOINT LIST

PART 6 – BUILD DATA INTEGRITY INTO YOUR PACKAGE

PART 1 – DOWNLOAD AND INSTALL SSIS TOOLBOX ITEMS

1. From the server where you will be building the SSIS solution, open your browser and navigate to this URL. http://sqlsrvintegrationsrv.codeplex.com/releases/view/17652

2. Download, run and follow the instructions to install SharePointListAdaptersSetup.msi (2008) or SharePointListAdaptersSetupForSqlServer2005.msi

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3. Close BIDS if it is open

4. Open BIDS from the Tools menu select Choose Toolbox Items.  Go to the SSIS Data Flow Items tab. – **See SQL Server 2012 Update at the end of this post.

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5. Add a checkmark to the SharePoint List Destination and SharePoint List Source items.

6. Open up or create a new Integration Services solution. Go to the Data Flow tab.

7. Open up the Toolbox

8. Drag SharePoint List Source from the General section…

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…to the Data Flow Sources section.

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9. Drag SharePoint List Destination from the General section…

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…to the Data Flow Destinations section.

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Now you are ready to use a SharePoint List as a source or destination in your packages.

PART 2 – USE THE SHAREPOINT LIST AS A DATA SOURCE

1. Create a Data Flow in your package.

2. Go to the Data Flow tab and drag the SharePoint List Source into the data flow as your source.

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3. Double click on the source.  Scroll down to the bottom where it says SiteURL.

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4. Paste the URL for the SharePoint site into the SiteURL (exclude anything from the word Lists onward in the URL)

Example: if your SharePoint site URL for Lists is

 http://ca-shpt01/Reporting/Lists/Department%20Groups/AllItems.aspx

then only type

http://ca-shpt01/Reporting/

5. Type the SiteListName.  For example if your List name is Departments,

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then type “Departments”.

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6. If you are wanting to import data from a particular view of this list in SharePoint, other than the default view, “MyView” for example:

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then add the name of the view in the SiteListViewName, otherwise leave it blank.

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7. Click the Refresh button at the bottom of the box to load the SharePoint List metadata into your Data Flow.

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8. Then click on the Column Mappings tab to see the columns available from your SharePoint list.

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9. Drag a Data Flow Destination onto your data flow and proceed as normal to pull data into your destination from the SharePoint list.

You’ll need to know a little about SharePoint lists to understand what data lives in which column.  You’ll need the ID column if you will be doing any updating from the data warehouse into the SharePoint list.  The Title is whatever item is the linked item in the SharePoint list – meaning if a user clicks on one of the items in the SharePoint list, which field is set up as the hyperlink to the item (usually the first column visible in the list).

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Because there is often a  push and a pull of data to and from the SharePoint list I tend to create a table in the data warehouse  specifically for the data from the SharePoint list and I let the source data dictate the table structure by clicking on the New button for the “Name of the Table or view”.  In this way, when the data gets pushed back to SharePoint there are no data type issues.

PART 3 – INSERT RECORDS INTO THE SHAREPOINT LIST

Keep in mind that the SharePoint list does not manage any data integrity, so if you add duplicate records with the same linked “Title”, Department Name in this case, you will get duplicate records in your list.  Be sure to configure your data source to insert only new records, not existing records. Here we will add any new Departments that have been added to the ERP system (if any) and push them up to SharePoint.

1. Add a Data Flow to your package.

2. Go to the Data Flow tab and drag an OLE DB source as your source. Configure your source to pull any new Departments that you want to insert into the SharePoint list.  In this example SP_Department is the data which has been imported from the SharePoint list, and DIM_Department holds the Departments imported from the ERP system:

SELECT   �
DP.Department_Code,
DP.Department_Description
FROM  SP_Department as SP RIGHT OUTER JOIN
dbo.DIM_Department as DP ON SP.Department_Code = DP.Department_Code�
    WHERE      SP.ID IS NULL

3. Drag the SharePoint List Destination into the data flow as your destination.

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4.  Double click on the SharePoint List Destination and configure the SiteUrl, SiteListName and SiteListViewName the same way you did in Part 2 steps 4-6 above.  In addition, ensure that the BatchType is set to Modification.  “Modification” is used for Updates and Inserts, “Deletion” is of course for Deletions.

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5. Click on the Refresh button in the bottom left of the Advanced Editor window and select the Input Columns tab.  Map the Source columns to the Destination columns.  Since we are INSERTING records, be sure NOT to map to the ID field. Doing so would have the data flow expect an update rather than an insert.

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Note that the Department_Description is being mapped to the Title field, which is the linked SharePoint field described in Part 2 – item 9, above.

6. Run your data flow task and check the SharePoint list for the added records.

PART 4 – UPDATE RECORDS INTO THE SHAREPOINT LIST

Here we want to update the Department descriptions in SharePoint, in case a user has decided to edit it.  The only item the user should be editing is the Department Group.

1. Add a Data Flow to your package.

2. Add an OLE DB Source to the Data Flow tab and configure the source with the correct query to update the Department descriptions for Departments that already exist in the SharePoint list.  For example:

SELECT   �
SP.ID,
DP.Department_Code,
DP.Department_Description
FROM  SP_Department as SP INNER JOIN
dbo.DIM_Department as DP ON SP.Department_Code = DP.Department_Code 

3. Drag the SharePoint List Destination into the data flow as your destination.

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4.  Double click on the SharePoint List Destination and configure the SiteUrl, SiteListName and SiteListViewName the same way you did in Part 2 steps 4-6 above.  Esure that the BatchType is set to Modification. 

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5. Click on the Refresh button in the bottom left of the Advanced Editor window and select the Input Columns tab.  Map the Source columns to the Destination columns.  Since we are UPDATING records, BE SURE TO map to the ID field. Without the ID the data flow will implement an insert rather than an update.

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6. Run your data flow task and check the SharePoint list for the updated Department Descriptions.

PART 5 – DELETE RECORDS INTO THE SHAREPOINT LIST

Here we want to delete any Department records from the SharePoint list that a user may have entered in error. The user training indicated to users that Departments should only be added from the ERP system and not by users.

1. Add a Data Flow to your package.

2. Add an OLE DB Source to the Data Flow tab and configure the source with the correct query to select the Departments for deletion from the SharePoint list.  The only field you need in the result is the ID field which maps to the ID in the SharePoint List.  If the ID is in this query it will get deleted from the SharePoint list.  In this example we will remove any duplicate records, and remove any Departments that don’t exist in the ERP system:

–DELETE DUPLICATE Department Codes.  Take the oldest record.
SELECT ID FROM SP_Department
WHERE Department_Code IN (
SELECT DP.Department_Code FROM  SP_Department as SP LEFT OUTER JOIN
dbo.DIM_Department as DP ON SP.Department_Code = DP.Department_Code�
GROUP BY DP.Department_Code HAVING COUNT (sp.id) > 1)
AND ID NOT IN
(SELECT MIN(ID) FROM SP_Department
WHERE Department_Code IN (
SELECT DP.Department_Code FROM  SP_Department as SP LEFT OUTER JOIN
dbo.DIM_Department as DP ON SP.Department_Code = DP.Department_Code�
GROUP BY DP.Department_Code HAVING COUNT (sp.id) > 1))

UNION
–DELETE Department Codes that don’t exist in ERPSELECT SP.ID FROM  SP_Department as SP LEFT OUTER JOIN
dbo.DIM_Department as DP ON SP.Department_Code = DP.Department_Code
WHERE      DP.Department_Code IS NULL

3. Drag the SharePoint List Destination into the data flow as your destination.

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4.  Double click on the SharePoint List Destination and configure the SiteUrl, SiteListName and SiteListViewName the same way you did in Part 2 steps 4-6 above.  In addition, ensure that the BatchType is set to Deletion.

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5. Click on the Refresh button in the bottom left of the Advanced Editor window and select the Input Columns tab.  Map the ID input column to the ID destination column.

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6. Run your data flow task and check the SharePoint list for the deleted Departments.

PART 6 – BUILD DATA INTEGRITY INTO YOUR PACKAGE

Putting this all together will enforce the data integrity for this simple list.  Here is what this package looks like.

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Here is what each step does.

1.  Truncate Tables: Truncates these tables –

DIM_Department
DIM_Department_Group
SP_Department

2. Populate DIM_Department – populates the DIM_Department table from the ERP system.

3. Retrieve Dept Group from SP – Populates the DIM_Department_Group table from another SharePoint List.  This is used as a drop down in the Department SP list for users to select the correct department.

4. Retrieve SP_Depts – Populates the SP_Department table from the SharePoint list. See Part 2 above.

5. Update SP Dept Descriptions – updates any modified Department descriptions.  See Part 4 above.

6.Add Missing Depts to SP – adds any new or missing Departments to the SharePoint list.  See Part 3 above.

7. Delete invalid Depts from SP – deletes any invalid Departments from the SharePoint list. See Part 5 above.

8.  Truncate SP_Depts – Truncate the SP_Department table in preparation for reload of corrected data.

9. Retrieve Updated SP_Depts – Populate SP_Department table from the updated SharePoint list. See Part 2 above.

10.  Update Dept Group Codes – Updates the DIM_Department table with the Department_Group_ID.

UPDATE DIM_Department
   SET Department_Group_ID = SP.Department_Group_ID
   FROM SP_Department AS SP INNER JOIN
DIM_Department as DP on DP.Department_Code = SP.Department_Code

This may seem like a lot of work, but it actually doesn’t take that much time once you get the hang of it.  Of course if you have more complex lists or require a lot of lists to manage this kind of data, you will want to look into other tools.  This is a good solution to the occasional one-off with a fairly simple data requirement, where the client doesn’t have another tool available to handle it.

Update April 24, 2012

If you are populating date fields, see this post.  http://dataqueen.unlimitedviz.com/2012/04/populating-date-fields-in-sharepoint-using-ssis/

Update May 2, 2012

SQL Server 2012:   All components that are installed on the local machine now automatically appear in the new SSIS Toolbox. When you install additional components, right-click inside the toolbox and then click Refresh Toolbox to add the components. The SharePoint List Destination and the SharePoint List Source appeared in the “Common” folder in the SSIS Toolbox when I refreshed the toolbox.

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